January’s Food & Drink Product Roundup 2019

I get products sent to me daily to try out. I unfortunately don’t have time to do a post for each item that I get to review. So I want to make sure these items get seen and learned about. The only other solution I could see to do is to do a January’s Food & Drink Product Roundup 2019 on the products I like and want my readers to know about. I hope you enjoy these as much as I and my other reviewers did.

Take a trip down a candy isle in Japan without leaving your home. I got this box to review and my teen kids loved eating their way through the box.

Japan Candy Box is to spread the love for fun Japanese candy & snacks all over the world! They are totally in love with everything Japanese, and snacks are a big part of the authentic Japan experience. To bring that experience to you, They carefully handpick the most popular candy & snacks that Japanese people actually eat, and curate them into an exciting monthly box you’ll surely love!

~ Check out my VIDEO ~

Plantain Flour

Flour made from dried green plantains has been key to Caribbean, West African, and South American cuisine for over a century. The plantain is a delicious source of nutrients, delivering vitamins A and C, fiber, folates, and more potassium than its cousin, the banana. Its indigestible, high-resistant starch content is thought to be beneficial to gut health, possibly reducing the risk of digestive disorders.

You can generally substitute plantain flour for regular flour in grain-free recipes. Use about three-quarters as much as you’d use for regular flour and add a bit of extra water or liquid. Also, keep in mind that plantain flour has a somewhat bitter flavor as it’s made from raw green plantains. You’ll want to taste as you go and correct for sweetness.

Let your imagination run wild with versatile, gluten-free plantain flour. Try some gooey brownies, bars, quick breads, cupcakes, and plantain pancakes or waffles

Teff Flour

Teff has been widely unavailable to the rest of the world until recently. It is best known as the basis for injera, the spongy, tangy flat bread found in place of forks and spoons at every Ethiopian meal.

First cultivated some 6,000 years ago, this tiny Ethiopian grain – about the size of a poppy seed — is thought to be one of the earliest domesticated plants known to man. It remains a staple of the East African diet to this day. Valued for its long shelf life, it offers a wealth of nutritional benefits including protein, fiber, calcium, iron, and other essential minerals.

The experts at Pereg say teff’s nutty, almost malty flavor lend an earthy surprise to baked goods, particularly those containing chocolate and brown sugar. Try using it in quick breads, muffins, scones, or chocolate chip cookies. Teff’s fine texture also makes an ideal pairing with buckwheat flour – think waffles, pancakes and crepes.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

10 thoughts on “January’s Food & Drink Product Roundup 2019

Tell me what you think